Jump to content

Welcome to Celica Club UK

Welcome to Celica Club UK, like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community, but don't worry this is a simple free process that requires minimal information. Take advantage of it immediately, Register Now or Sign In.

  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics and forums to get automatic updates
  • Add events to our community calendar
  • Get your own profile and make new friends
  • Customize your experience here
  • Use the wealth of knowledge our members have to help with any questions you may have.

E10 Petrol september 2021!!!


Recommended Posts

I just been checking out Toyota GB Blog and they have some info on  this:

 

" This change will not affect Toyota owners with a diesel-powered vehicle.

Which Toyota models can use E10 petrol?

If your Toyota has a petrol engine or hybrid powertrain and was officially produced for European markets since January 1998, it will be compatible with E10 petrol.

The only exceptions to this rule are the following vehicles:

  • Toyota Avensis with 2.0-litre 1AZ-FSE engine made between July 2000 and October 2008.
  • Toyota Avensis with 2.4-litre 2AZ-FSE engine made between June 2003 and October 2008.

If your vehicle was produced before January 1998, it cannot use E10 fuel.

Can you use E10 petrol in imported cars?

If your car is an imported model that was not official sold in European markets, we recommend staying on E5 by using super unleaded, which has a higher octane rating. Having received queries from owners regarding specific imported models, we are investigating this further. "

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, CheltGirl said:

I just been checking out Toyota GB Blog and they have some info on  this:

 

" This change will not affect Toyota owners with a diesel-powered vehicle.

Which Toyota models can use E10 petrol?

If your Toyota has a petrol engine or hybrid powertrain and was officially produced for European markets since January 1998, it will be compatible with E10 petrol.

The only exceptions to this rule are the following vehicles:

  • Toyota Avensis with 2.0-litre 1AZ-FSE engine made between July 2000 and October 2008.
  • Toyota Avensis with 2.4-litre 2AZ-FSE engine made between June 2003 and October 2008.

If your vehicle was produced before January 1998, it cannot use E10 fuel.

Can you use E10 petrol in imported cars?

If your car is an imported model that was not official sold in European markets, we recommend staying on E5 by using super unleaded, which has a higher octane rating. Having received queries from owners regarding specific imported models, we are investigating this further. "

I'd be concerned if it did affect people with diesel Toyotas :lol:

 

But what I don't understand is, why does it affect 97 and before, but not 98 onwards? What was changed in 98 year celicas over 97 and before? Was there some legislation that made them use different materials or something? 

It sounds almost like they're just giving a blanket statement year just to be safe and keep it simple... Could be my ignorance though... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Fuppylodders said:

I'd be concerned if it did affect people with diesel Toyotas :lol:

 

But what I don't understand is, why does it affect 97 and before, but not 98 onwards? What was changed in 98 year celicas over 97 and before? Was there some legislation that made them use different materials or something? 

It sounds almost like they're just giving a blanket statement year just to be safe and keep it simple... Could be my ignorance though... 

 

I'd hazzard a guess that coping with E10 was made a legal  requirement in Europe in 98, therefore a blanket statement.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spotted this on YouTube …could work if smaller quantities of fuel are required for classic motorbikes or even lawnmowers/ chainsaws etc but would be rather time consuming for a classic car .

        

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Extract from the Esso website - I have been using their Esso Supreme 99 recently and my car certainly seems to like it.  Ethanol free, except in some areas.

 

Although our pumps have E5 labels on them, our Synergy Supreme+ 99 is actually ethanol free (except, due to technical supply reasons, in Devon, Cornwall, North Wales, North England and Scotland). Legislation requires us to place these E5 labels on pumps that dispense unleaded petrol with ‘up to 5% ethanol’, including those that contain no ethanol, which is why we display them on our Synergy Supreme+ 99 pumps.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That esso fuel is silly high price here. I just stick with momentum99. Shame ecu is encrypted and cant be mapped to make better use of high octane. 2zz would probably put out the full 190 then lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, slybunda said:

That esso fuel is silly high price here. I just stick with momentum99. Shame ecu is encrypted and cant be mapped to make better use of high octane. 2zz would probably put out the full 190 then lol.

The beams EXU in mine is mapped for 100RON Japanese fuel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 weeks later...

I've  just run my first full tank on the new E10 fuel in the CS.

I ran it right down then put £20 in just in case i needed to drain it down and had no problems with it, so when that ran down I went for a full tank.

Not only has it not had any running issues but if anything it feels better.

Like Chris says, some of us have been running 5% ethanol for 30 years plus so if ethanol is going to cause any degradation it would of done it by now, though I suspect those cars on the incompatible list may have specific component effected by ethanol and would more then likely increase the speed of deterioration with the 5% extra. Also if a manufacture puts a blanket time limit on its vehicles then they wont be open to legal action if something goes wrong, you only have to look at the diesel emission fiasco, if there is chance of free money people will jump at it.

In time it will be interesting to compare mpg, but right now after my first tank I've not noticed any difference. Dorris   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Safest bet is to stick with premium then, probably what most of us are running anyway. I'm just hoping they leave that alone, even if the price jumps a bit as a result. 

 

Maybe an old wives' tale, but isn't Momentum artificially pushed to 99 RON by using bioethanol anyway? Probably safer to stick with BP/Shell premiums, but I get that can be a pain. I do get a bit bored of having to drive 20 mins away when there is a petrol station in the village XD

 

On 15/07/2021 at 20:17, Askari said:

The beams EXU in mine is mapped for 100RON Japanese fuel.

 

Had that issue with my old 185 and it only ran properly on V Power... CS is a UK model, so should be ok, though with a stand alone I'll set it for 97 RON. 

Edited by EasyRight89
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Monkey Boy 1 said:

Interesting, I asked this question on one of the Gen 6 FB pages about how the Mainland Europe owners cope with E10 fuel. So far ALL of them have said no issues. 

 

The plot thickens.:think:

 

I think any effects won't be seen for some time in any case. Best to play safe in meantime I think

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am using e10 in my 98 rav4 with 3sfe engine - really no different engine to the celica or car to be honest, although rust will prob get that one before the e10 has any noticable impact!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Classic Car world has some nice pointers: https://classicsworld.co.uk/guides/e10-fuel-a-classic-owners-guide/

 

Key snippet:

Quote

In addition to running issues caused by the mixture-leaning effect of E10, information issued by the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC) explains that the increased acidity, conductivity and inorganic chloride content of ethanol in E10 can cause corrosion and tarnishing of metal components. But while this can be controlled effectively by corrosion inhibitor additives, the same cannot yet be said for its compatibility with elastomers such as seals, flexible pipes and other unsuitable gasket materials.

New E10 fuel provides a greater threat to rubber fuel hoses.

New E10 fuel provides a greater threat to rubber fuel hoses.

 

Ethanol molecules are smaller and more polar than conventional petrol components, meaning there is a lower energy barrier for them to diffuse into elastomer materials. These materials will swell and soften, weakening the elastomer structure, and on drying out they can shrink and crack resulting in fuel leaks.

 

As yet, the FBHVC is not aware of, or has tested, any additives that claim complete fuel system protection with respect to elastomer and gasket materials when E10 is used. While there hasn’t been an endemic of failures in other territories where E10 is already established, the FHBVC sensibly recommends that such materials are replaced with ethanol compatible materials before using E10.

 

The good news there is that uprated parts are available. For example, Burlen Fuel Systems has worked with knowledgeable suppliers over the last 15 years to introduce upgraded rubber with Viton content for parts like carb needle valve tips, diaphragms and jet seals, along with cellular foam carb floats and upgraded needle material. It also buys all its fuel hose from Goodrich as it knows it has been properly tested.

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I run my JDM engined Gen4 and JDM 2005 Honda Euro-R on Vpower, it was 147 about 3 weeks ago at one of the couple of Shells i use near me, was 151 I think last week... Luckily i work locally,the Honda is my daily but a commute in either isn't needed. 

Edited by Sherv
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.