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AlexD

final brake grease question

Question

Okay. I've stripped couple sets of brake calipers and pistons. On my Curren (and yes its technically a celica gen 6) I'm going to purchase all the bits for a complete strip and rebuild of front and rear brakes.  But which grease to which parts? And reason for same. Reading up I see reference to red grease, copper grease, lithium white grease etc. And no definitive answer which is best and where

 So here's the question: 

Sllider bolts that the carriers run on.  Which grease and why?.

Threaded Bolts to tighten and secure. So they don't sease. Grease and reason.

Metal clips/runners./ edges of pads. Which grease and why.

Anywhere else that should be greased and reason/type.

And obviously no grease to disks and no grease to face of brake pads....

 

I have red grease. High temp lithium grease and copper grease.

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The slider pins need proper silicone brake grease.

 

Any other type may have detrimental effect on the rubber seals causing break down and let dirt in.

and/or get baked-on due to the very high temperature leaving a black cooked on mess which prevents the pins from sliding which is probably one of the main reasons why people have so many pin sticking issues.

 

Copper slip is good on the clips that hold the pad edges, and on rear of pads.

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Red RUBBER grease (not just red, it must be for rubber) or Silicon grease on the caliper sliders.  Anything else on these will swell the rubber boots, let water in and seize the sliders.  Also, its worthwhile replacing the rubber boots (they just pop off with a little levering, hammer new ones on with a socket that they fit in) and the actual sliders if the old ones are pitted or scored.  You can get a complete kit that includes the sliders, through bolts, rubber boots and silicon grease from brakeparts.co.uk

 

On the pad edges and other pad contact areas I use a little Ceratec which you can get form ECP for a few quid.  This is a very high temperature, non dripping, non metallic, grease specifically designed for brake assembly on the metal to metal bits.  Anything else is likely to melt.  You don't need much, just a little smear.  Put too much on and you end up with big globs of disgusting grease/brake dust/road grime mix.

 

For all the assembly bolts, a tiny smear of copper grease on the threads - its high enough temp to survive, and helps prevent the threads galling.  Most people overdo it, but again you only need a tiny smear - with too much you actually alter the applied torque of the bolt and risk loosening.

 

I don't personally grease anything else.

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That's where I was getting conflicting info. Some said red grease sliders others white silicon grease.  So red grease can take the temperature?.

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16 minutes ago, AlexD said:

That's where I was getting conflicting info. Some said red grease sliders others white silicon grease.  So red grease can take the temperature?.

 

Unless you get your discs glowing, the sliders don't get that hot.   Think of it this way - the main purpose of red rubber grease is to pre-lubricate rubber piston seals and rings inside callipers and brake cylinders during assembly (though I concede that is very small amounts)

 

I, and many others have been using red rubber grease on sliders for years without any issues whatsoever.  Sometimes I use silicon, depends what ive got handy.  My preference is for rubber grease though as I find silicon gives the sliders a less smooth slidey motion

 

 

Edited by G.Lewarne

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